Education Enigma: What American Historical Sites Teach Us about the Education of Ex-Enslaved Africans

Price: $23.95
Product prices and availability are accurate as of 2020-04-05 01:13:10 UTC and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on http://www.amazon.com/ at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.
CERTAIN CONTENT THAT APPEARS ON THIS SITE COMES FROM AMAZON SERVICES LLC. THIS CONTENT IS PROVIDED 'AS IS' AND IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR REMOVAL AT ANY TIME.

Manufacturer Description

The book, "Education Enigma: What American Historical Sites Teach Us About the Education of Ex-Enslaved Africans" explores the journey into education by newly-freed Enslaved Africans and their descendants. It covers the post-Civil War period onward to the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court decision and the Civil Rights Movement. It is written by two African American men, a retired U.S. Diplomat and a former Defense Intelligence Officer, who take a cross-country tour during a summer break. They conducted observational and participatory research at 17 historical sites in the South and Midwest seeking to answer several key questions that haunt the memories of Blacks in the United States. Why was education considered the number one goal of freed Blacks? How did they get it under conditions of extreme brutality and injustice? They find answers outside the usual school textbook responses and reactions.Newly-freed Enslaved Africans and education are two thoughts in the brain that reside far apart. Even the meanings are opposite. Ex-Enslaved Africans thought that formal education could make a way for a better life, finally freeing them. Then the big reality set in that some people would do them serious bodily harm for little or no reason. Not the same as it was under slavery when the master needed every live body he could find to work the farm or plantation. Education, then, became less than a dream for the vast majority. It was replaced by basic day to day survival, which became the new “school” and the only school unfettered ‘Whites’ allowed them to attend. The authors skillfully tell readers how this ultimately weakened the identity of African Americans today and propose what they can do about it.

Write a Review